Bear Creek Bridge Replacement

McElhanney is providing a wide array of services for this project including structural, civil, and hydrological engineering, environmental, visualization, and arborist services. McElhanney developed the images to help illustrate the project concept.

Pine Pass and South Peace Floods

Following severe rain in June 2011, Hwy 97 experienced floods between Pine Pass and 20km south of Chetwynd (a length of 60km), with 73 damaged sites. This flooding resulted in the loss of culverts and bridge end fills, and washouts along various portions of the highway, forcing closure of this vital route.

Pattullo Bridge Deck Rehabilitation

TransLink and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure brought on McElhanney as the prime consultant to address deck repairs and create both a traffic management plan and an operations plan. The result was comprehensive plan that allowed the bridge deck rehabilitation to be completed and re-opened ahead of schedule.

Port Mann Highway 1 Roadworks and Detour Designs

During construction, more than 120,000 vehicles drove over the Port Mann Bridge every day, ranging from commuters (travelling 80km/h) to slow-moving construction machinery. The detour designs needed to incorporate HOV lanes, cycling lanes, and dedicated bus and truck ramps, and ensure high-speed and low-speed traffic did not mix.

Veer Kunwar Singh Setu

The Veer Kunwar Singh Setu is a four lane highway bridge over the Ganga (Ganges) River near Patna in Bihar, India. It was procured through a Design-Build contract. McElhanney successfully value engineered an extradosed segmental bridge concept with 16 back-to-back 120m-long spans that reduced construction duration and material consumption for the 1,920m navigation spans portion of the 4km bridge. Approach spans outside the navigation spans utilizes precast segmental erected in span-by-span. The bridge opened in June 2017.

Southwest Calgary Ring Road

Calgary, AB – The Government of Alberta and the City of Calgary began planning for the Calgary Ring Road in the 1970s. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the province purchased most of the land needed for the transportation utility corridor around Calgary where the ring road would be built. The northwest, northeast, and southeast sections are now in operation – known collectively as Stoney Trail – and motorists now have 70km of free-flow travel.